Friday, 25 February 2011

Come and Meet Award Winning Children's Author, Barbara Mitchelhill...

I've got a grandson called Damian so when I spotted some Damian Drooth, Supersleuth books, I just had to read them.
I enjoyed them so much I kept a look out for new titles from Barbara - her thrillers for 8-12 year olds are great, too, and Storm Runners won The Solihull Children's Book Award.
Dangerous Diamonds was nominated for The Stockport Children's Book Award 2010 (I lived in Stockport for years) and The West Sussex Book Award 2011.

The third coincidence was when I heard about Barbara's latest book: Run Rabbit Run


It's set in WW2 and I'm about to send out a proposal of a book for 8-10s set at that time. (I was more than slightly worried at first but, luckily, my storyline and theme is completely different.)
Run Rabbit Run begins in Rochdale and, although it was a long time after WW2, I lived and worked in Rochdale for a few year; Barbara also lived in Rochdale at one time but not when I was there.
Anyway, what with loving Barbara's books - and the coincidences - I thought it would be great to have her as a guest on my blog.

And here she is...


What's more, Barbara is willing to answer your questions.
Barbara, my questions are, "What made you write a book set in WW2?" and "Did you surround yourself with items from that era while you were writing Run Rabbit Run?"

Go and have a look around Barabara's website: http://www.barbaramitchelhill.com/ to see all the books she's written then ask your questions in the Comments section for this post.
Oh, and Barbara's offering a signed copy of Run Rabbit Run as a prize. On March 4th, official publication day, the names of those who've asked a question (or questions) will go in a hat and Barbara will get her dog, Ella, to paw out a name.

23 comments:

Debs Carr said...

I love the sound of these books and am off to Barbara's site right now.

Elpi said...

Had a look at Barbara's great site. I would like to ask her how often her original story idea changes by the time she finishes a book?

Nell Dixon said...

It sounds like something Miss la would enjoy - will look out for it when i next go to the bookstore

Pat Posner said...

Hi, Debs
They're great books.
Don't forget to come back with a question for Barbara!

Pat Posner said...

Elpi, good to see you here!
Barbara will be answering questions soon.

Pat Posner said...

Hi, Nell
Tell Miss La to go here to hear Barbara reading the first chapter: http://andersenpress.co.uk/authors/view/410

Posie said...

I am always on the look out for good books that will inspire my children to read. They do love books, so I will be checking these books out with my youngest.

Amanda Ashby said...

Wow, the new book sounds great!!! Are you planning to do some more WW2 ones?

Amanda said...

Run Rabbit Run sounds great!

Good luck with your own proposal too, Pat.

My question is ... did you base and of your story on real-life experience.

x

Shirley Wells said...

The cover has grabbed my attention. I love it!

Recently, a teacher in Bacup found himself in trouble for telling young pupils that war had broken out. I gather the girls were in tears and the boys loved every second of it! I'd like to ask Barbara if she thinks Run Rabbit Run is likely to appeal more to boys than girls.

I shall be checking out the Damian Drooth books as I'm determined to get my grandson hooked on books. :)

Anonymous said...

How do you decide what to call your characters? Do you get their names before you write the story?

Edward

Flowerpot said...

Sounds great - off to have a look now. Thanks Pat!

Debs Carr said...

I'd misread and thought I needed to leave a comment on Barbara's site, then couldn't find where. (There's no hope for me sometimes).

When writing Run Rabbit Run was it difficult writing the dialogue?

I'm researching a WW1 book at the moment and very conscious about how their vocabulary was quite different to ours at times.

Pat Posner said...

LOL, Debs
That was my fault. I suddenly realised what I'd written read as though the questions should be posted on Barbara's site so I added an extra bit to my post!

Thanks to all who've commented or asked a question. Barbara will be replying soon.

Anonymous said...

Barbara Mitchelhill
Elpi - It never fails to surprise me how much a book changes in the writing. Sometimes a character will step into the story from nowhere. It's all very exciting!

Anonymous said...

Barbara Mitchelhill.
Posie - I agree. Getting children to read is so important. That's why I like to write exciting, page-turners. It's so rewarding when a child says, 'I've never read a big book before but I couldn't put it down.'

Anonymous said...

Barbara Mitchelhill
Amanda Ashby-I'm not planning another WW2 book at present. My next book is almost finished (can't talk about it) and I have the brief outline for the next one. Maybe after that...

Anonymous said...

Barbara Mitchelhill
Amanda - not sure if this question is for me but I did use places that were real and many of the happenings in S Wales were based on stories told to me by my Welsh friend, Joy whose father was a pilot (mechant navy)during the war. The plan crash behind her house really did happen.

Anonymous said...

Barbara Mitchelhill
Shirley Wells - I'm not trying to sit on the fence, but I think it will appeal to both. Lizzie is a very spunky girl who wouldn't bore any boy! Most of all, I think it's a really exciting romp even though it's set in the war with all its problems.

Anonymous said...

Barbara Mitchelhill.
Anonymous - Chosing names in a modern story is easy. I have a 'baby book' which I flick through until I find one which I think will suit my character. If the book is a period piece, this requires some research. For instance, the range of sirst names in Tudor period is amazingly limited but surname can be v strange. I usuall have to get the name before I start to write although there have been one or two that I've changed half way through a book.

Barbara said...

Barbara Mitchelhill
Debs Carr - I love writing dialogue. Yes, you're right vocabulary does change. I always try to get inside the heads of my characters so that they talk for themselves. With Tudor period, I've had to look up a fabulous word in my big dictionary to find out if it was used in that period. Quite often it didn't arrive until too late for me and that is so frustrating!

Anonymous said...

Barbara Mitchelhill

Thanks for all the questions. I've asked Ella to pick out the winner and it's....
SHIRLEY WELLS! Hurray!
Congratulations. Now I just need an address to send it to.

Shirley Wells said...

Yay! I never win anything.

Thank you so much, Barbara. I'm thrilled to be chosen! Just off to pass on my address.